Discrimination 


Discrimination has been in the news a lot nowadays, especially with the Trump administrations view on Muslims from certain countries and the Mexican-American border. Recently, I experienced discrimination due to my use of a guide dog and hit me harder and in different ways than before, and I think a large part of that is because of all the discrimination happening in this world nowadays. 

I was in Houston for a work conference and was out with co-workers, some I knew, some I didn’t, for my best friend’s birthday dinner. We both work for the same amazing agency, as counselors, just in different offices. I walk in and am immediately thrown off a little bit because of the dim lighting which makes my residual vision go away. Immediately, as in I had only taken two steps inside, I am asked if Makiko is a service dog. I said yes. We went closer to the table. I sit down, am asked by somebody else. I say yes. I hadn’t even sat down long enough at the table to get Makiko fully settled before this second time being asked. Throughout the night I am asked about 4 times. However, what really really got me upset was I was sitting a few seats away from my best friend’s husband. He was the only male there at this point. He asked me if Makiko had papers. I thought he was just curious although I was pretty sure he should have known the answer. I said she did have an ID. He then said “this gentleman would like to see them.” I hadn’t even seen the man standing behind him at this point. I said “well he can’t..” and then the guy said to me with a very disgruntled tone “ok..” and then walked away. As we were leaving, the waitress was so excited to see Makiko and had NO idea that Makiko was under the table. That is a compliment and how it should be. 

However this “does she have papers?” thing really got to me. I later found out that the guy friend who the staff asked this question to tried to explain to him a few times that I am blind and she is my service dog before he really insisted on seeing papers. It bothers me that he was that insistent. It also bothers me that he asked the male at the table, not me. Finally, what really bothers me is im fairly sure, but not positive, that the gentleman who asked had already asked me earlier on if she was a SD. This was harassment. What has really resonated on my heart though is the “do you have papers” comment and how there have been a lot of members of the immigrant community and even permanent residents and citizens of different ethnicities have been asked this recently. Now I am being asked about my service dog, and not myself, but it still struck me pretty hard.. as if they didn’t think we had a right to be there. 

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, we are only allowed to be asked if she is a service dog and what tasks is she trained to perform? I found in Houston in general they asked this far more than any other place I have travelled. We went into one restaurant and my friend’s everybody was giving us the stink eye. I haven’t had this much trouble or stink in a long time. 

I have several very close friends who are undocumented. I have a lot of friends who are legit scared of losing their loved ones for a while do to being of a different ethnicity. 

I did write the business that did this and they were pretty receptive and apologetic and said they would be following up with the staff that night personally as well as sending out a message about discrimination to all employees. I appreciated that and their response was better than most people have responded with reported discrimination. 

There is just something really wrong about all of this, what happened to me in the restaurant but also what is happening in our country right now. It leaves you literally with a bad taste in your mouth, feeling depressed, and sick. 

When can we go back to loving our neighbor? Loving all.. 

Published by

Jessica N and Makiko

Jessica is a proud Texan. She graduated in 2014 with her Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling and is now employed. She is visually impaired and has a retinal disease, Retinitis Pigmentosa. Originally Jessica started blogging about everything from being diagnosed with the disease to where she is now, almost 9 years later. Then, Jessica went to Guide Dogs for the Blind and was blessed with Makiko, her new guide dog. Now, her blog "The Way Eye See The World" is about everything related to visual impairments, including guide dogs.

2 thoughts on “Discrimination ”

  1. Jessica, I could not agree with you more – on all accounts. You continue to be a strong advocate for yourself and others within the disabled community, and also within other disenfranchised communities such as immigrants, refugees, etc.

    Jenelle

  2. A very powerful piece. I’m so sorry you had to go through that even once, let alone so many times in one evening. The establishment responded well to your email and hopefully followed through by speaking to their staff. In Australia all service dogs are required to wear identification that is visible without the need to disturb the owner. Even with that measure, some people are still refused entry to restaurants and theatres etc.

    You are right that this type of intolerance and suspicion is growing, not just for the immigrant community. It seems that bigotry has been given a green light due to recent political changes in the world. But people are fighting back on a local level and reaching out when they see injustice. So many blogs that I read, are speaking out. There is hope if we are all diligent.

    I hope you do not experience this again. Best wishes, Kate.

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